Minty

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Minty

Postby seanolyte » Thu Feb 12, 2009 12:47 am

There are so many vintage synths out there that just have been hammered, and aren't in the greatest of all condition.

Fair enough however that a lot of these have been gigged with and transported from place to place.

But I seem to get an impression from some that condition isn't of too upmost concern- just as long as it sounds correct, and isn't in too bad of a bust.

Am I the only one that wants to keep my synths in absolute mint-as-possible condition?

Keeping these 25+ year old puppies in incredible condition is a feat to be honest. Imagine 30,40,50 years from now. Still these analog beauties in mint condition. Not only the resale value would be incredible, but just the sheer fact something so old is in amazing condition. Show's respect, caring, and so forth to the equipment.

Obviously mint ones are harder to find, and just judging from pictures on an eBay auction sometimes doesn't so justice (so called "mint condition"). Lighting, angle, resolution, etc, can all put it off. Sometimes even in a high-resolution photo something looks nice, but the lighting/angle is deceiving it's appearance. Hey- it's always a risk.

I've been a bit impulse-buying lately, jumping at rare synth opportunities whereby usually they wouldn't have arisen. Have some good synths in good condition, but they are unfortunately not mint. Now started to regret it I guess. But can always wait for a mint one to pop up, and just sell the originals. Or how about blowing a &*^# load of money on a new paint job?- heh heh.- I'll give it a miss. A thorough, detailed clean can really spice up a synth though- not so much luck with rust though.

There's something great about owning immaculate mint condition old equipment, aye?

Hmm- I think I'm stating the obvious.

Cheers
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Postby Kurt » Thu Feb 12, 2009 12:52 am

I guess that, just like cars, old synths (anything for that matter) can be lovingly restored. As long as you don't expect them to be worth what you've spent (in time and/or money)
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Postby Thirteen » Thu Feb 12, 2009 9:21 am

Hi Andy, welcome to the forum, I only buy machines in very good cosmetic condition, unless it is something that I desperately want for some project and can't find one in good nick. If I knew I was taking something out on a long tour and it was going to take a beating, then I would buy a rough one and just restore it electronically to make it reliable. You have seen some of my gear, I keep it pretty tip-top.
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Postby ChrisW » Thu Feb 12, 2009 4:04 pm

I'm most concerned with the sound.... and the thing has to perform well.
I don't really care what it looks like as I make music rather than collect synths.
I have a couple of very rare synths that I use a lot and they sound amazing. If they had been museum quality I couldn't have afforded them.
Each to their own.
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Postby no-fi » Thu Feb 12, 2009 6:54 pm

I agree.

I'm more than happy for my gear to be dinged up and marked as long as it rocks out when I play it!
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Postby Thirteen » Thu Feb 12, 2009 9:11 pm

Part of the issue for me is that if the machine is dirty and beaten up on the outside, then it has had a hard life, and from experience will likely be full of dirt and corrosion and will just be a pain to keep going.
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Postby seanolyte » Sun Feb 15, 2009 12:30 am

Thirteen wrote:Hi Andy, welcome to the forum, I only buy machines in very good cosmetic condition, unless it is something that I desperately want for some project and can't find one in good nick. If I knew I was taking something out on a long tour and it was going to take a beating, then I would buy a rough one and just restore it electronically to make it reliable. You have seen some of my gear, I keep it pretty tip-top.


Hi Steve, thanks. Yes, your gear is in absolutely amazing condition! I've been cleaning my synths like mad, trying to get them as sparkly as possible- have to be VERY careful with solvents though, especially metho, paint can come off so easily.

Kurt, yes I agree with you there, after spending all this cash on vintage items sometimes their resale won't be the best, but as it's something I love it's all worth it to me.

ChrisW & no-fi, I understand what you're saying- the idea behind these things is to produce sound and music, so really that it is it's main focus- if it's dinged up but still producing the awesome sound it's still doing it's primary purpose. I guess I just like having the great looks as well to compliment it's great sound.
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Postby ChrisW » Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:30 am

I have no problem with 'minty'.
'Minty' would be great.
I can't always afford minty. I agree it probably is a risk, but so far I've done OK out of buying less than museum quality synths. Touch wood.
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